If you’re a nurturing person—say your friends call you the mom or the dad of your friend group—these side hustle ideas might help you think more strategically about what kind of side hustle is right for you.

Side Hustle Ideas for Nurturers

If you’re a nurturer, you might really relate to some of these ideas, but have a hard time wrapping your head around the idea of charging for them. Let’s be clear: just because you’re good at something or because it’s a part of who you are does not mean you can’t or shouldn’t be paid for it. In fact, it’s because you’re passionate and skilled at something that you should even consider making it your side hustle.

I won’t preach about all that—this time. But I want you to keep an open mind.

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Side Hustle Ideas for Nurturers

Teaching

Teaching is probably a very obvious option. But if you have a day job, and that job isn’t being a teacher, you might not see how you can make this into something that makes money for you.

There are a lot of ways that you can teach that don’t involve traditional classroom teaching.

You can teach an online course, you can write a book or a series of books, you can teach your own live-stream course, you can do live in-person talks, you can do webinars—there are several options available to you.

But then, what do you teach?

Well if you have a particular skill, like guitar playing, for example, you could teach people to play guitar. But, you might even be able to teach something that less nurturing folks would neglect to teach. Maybe your guitar techniques prevent students from having to build callus when they start learning the guitar.

Or, maybe you have some techniques that are helpful to older people who may have trouble getting their hands into certain positions. This is a way for you to take your specific skill set and find ways to teach them that are different from other teachers.

Tutoring

Tutoring is another great option for nurturers. Now, this is slightly different from teaching because tutors pick up where a teacher left off. You’ll need to be good at identifying the part of a subject a student doesn’t understand, and then working to build that weak area.

For example, you could be working with someone who is alright at general math, but really struggles with geometry. You need to be able to identify the specific problem that they’re having because they may not be able to articulate it for you.

Nannying

Nannying is not the same as babysitting. Babysitting is when somebody gives you their kid for a little while and you just keep them safe for a little while. Maybe you do some activities with them. You may even feed the kid, but it’s a short amount of time. Even if you babysit for the same family more than once, you’ll have minimal long-term responsibilities.

Nannies might be responsible for part of this child’s development. As a nanny, you might be responsible for organizing, and transporting the child to and from, play dates. You’ll need to get to know the children that the kid you’re nannying spends time with—and you’ll want to get to know their parents and/or nannies.

Nannying can be a full-time job, but it doesn’t have to be. You may encounter a family who needs nannying only on weekends because the child is in extracurricular activities during the week. Or a family who needs a nanny just for the times that the family is travelling (which might be your chance to see the world). So if you like children, have the patience for children, and can commit to becoming an extended part of someone else’s family, this might be for you.

Animal Care

Another option for nurturers is animal care. Animal care can be a great side hustle because people have pets that they can’t take everywhere.

Let’s say you love dogs, but you live in a place where you can’t have pets, becoming a dog walker can help you spend time with dogs that you don’t have to house.

Alternatively, if you’re really good with animals, you might be able to offer them basic home training. Maybe you’re really good at housebreaking new pets. You could offer “potty training” to families who’ve brought a new pet into the home.

You can absolutely use what you know about animals to make someone else’s life easier. Kick back at the dog park and start some conversations.

Elder Care

This one, depending on the kind of community you come from, might be controversial—but I’m going to go with it anyway.

If you have a soft-spot for and know the needs of the elderly, you might have found the right side hustle. And, yes, lots of people volunteer to help the elderly—but you can offer more than an hour or two here and there like other volunteers.

Let’s say there’s an older person on your street whose children or relatives don’t live nearby and only visit occasionally. You can offer your services to the family, rather than the elderly person themselves.

Maybe they’d like to know that someone is checking in on their loved one regularly. Maybe this relative doesn’t want a nurse, but still needs someone to make sure they’ve eaten or taken their medicine or made it to their doctor’s appointments or needs someone to go to the grocery store or pharmacy for them.

When you really think about all of what an elderly neighbor might need, it’s a lot more like a job than an act or two of kindness. Which, in some cases, is why family just can’t manage it and could really use the help.


What do you think are some side hustle ideas for nurturers? Tell us in the comments.

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